Mesh Without Wires

June 17, 2011

When City Surveillance Cameras Aren’t There To Monitor Crowds: 1993 vs 2011

While checking up on the goings-on in Dallas related to Mavericks Victory Parade on June 16, I came across a pretty disturbing report on the 1993 parade following a Dallas Cowboys Super Bowl victory. It turned from celebration to riot and 18 people were hurt with more than a dozen others arrested. You can view the video report here: 1993 Cowboy Parade a Disaster.

"Firetide-inside' Dallas PD camera in front of City Hall, parade's starting point

"Firetide-inside' Dallas PD camera in front of City Hall, the parade's starting point (click to enlarge)

The reasons: poor planning, not enough first responders, and no way to monitor and manage crowds.

Compare it to yesterday’s parade where the biggest problem was getting people out of the downtown area following the parade. Everything else went without a hitch.

More than 250,o00 fans attended the parade. Ahead of the parade, WFAA.com reported:

“The department will monitor everything out of the Fusion Center and two command centers. They’ll keep a close eye on what’s happening with the parade crowds. DPD will use downtown surveillance cameras and a live view from its helicopter.

“It gives us awareness if the crowds are getting too big and if there’s a fight that we need to apply additional resources,”explained Lt. Todd Thomasson, who runs the Fusion Center.”

In fact, during the ASIS 2010 Dallas Police Department tour, the police representatives told us that any downtown parade route is planned around the camera locations, so that first responders have complete visibility into what’s going on and if any issues are cropping up.

In addition to fixed cameras, DPD used their mobile command center, which we also had a chance to visit during the ASIS tour. The mobile command center, as the entire surveillance system, now at 150+ cameras, was designed and deployed by our long-term integrator partner Bearcom. The system uses Sony IP cameras (mostly pan-tilt-zoom) and OnSSI video management system.

Read the full story and view the video on the parade preparations at WFAA.com: Surveillance cams, undercover cops to monitor parade crowd

For more information on the Dallas deployment, see:

By Ksenia Coffman – Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

4 Comments »

  1. This basically tells the story how you integrate Video Surveillance with Security efforts.
    * you deploy a Mobile Unit (trailer or helicopter)
    * you define a perimeter
    * Public is educated on the use and reason(s)

    One does not replace the other {as some lead you to believe}, but a extension and a integrated tool that expands Security efforts. The basis behind many of these systems in metropolitan areas is PUBLIC SAFETY. Especially when conventional methods expose their weakness / vulnerabilities.

    The next story in this tale is when the Public (Private Sector) starts to integrate their Video with the Network. Something Chicago has been doing for a while…

    Comment by John M. Feeney — July 8, 2011 @ 10:04 am | Reply

  2. Anyone with valuables at home (including loved ones) should protect them with security cameras. There many options available. You can even be alerted on your phone or email when motion is detected.

    Comment by Security Camera Systems — July 20, 2011 @ 11:56 am | Reply

  3. How is the mesh wlan implemented here? Currently there are fixed backlinks as i can see it on the pictures, is that right?

    Comment by Markus Brinkmann — October 11, 2012 @ 5:23 am | Reply

  4. Aw, this was a very good post. Finding the
    time and actual effort to make a superb article… but what can I say… I put things off a whole lot and don’t seem to get nearly anything done.

    Comment by Louis Cunningham — July 29, 2013 @ 1:38 pm | Reply


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